Association of Research Libraries

University of Washington Libraries

Library Assessment Conference

Building Effective, Sustainable, Practical Assessment


2016 Library Assessment Conference
Arlington, Virginia
October 31–November 2, 2016
#lac16
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2012 Workshops

Sunday, October 28
Library Value: Conceptualizing, Capturing, & Communicating Impact
(Noon-4:00PM)

Thursday, November 1
Library Space Assessment: Bringing the Focus to Teaching and Learning
(8:30AM-3:30PM)
Getting Started with Learning Outcomes Assessment: Purposes, Practical Options, and Impact
(8:30AM-3:30PM)
Working Effectively with LibQUAL+®
(8:30AM-3:30PM)
Successfully Managing Strategic Change with the Balanced Scorecard
(8:30AM-Noon)


Library Value: Conceptualizing, Capturing, & Communicating Impact

Leader: Megan Oakleaf (iSchool, Syracuse University)

Sunday, October 28, Noon-4:00PM
Fee: $80

Need to define, demonstrate, and develop the institutional impact of your library? Overwhelmed by the challenges ahead? Seeking clarity for the way forward?

Intended for librarians engaging an academic library value project, initiative, or research agenda. This half-day workshop will include mini-lectures, discussion, and hands-on activities to engage participants in answering three questions:

  1. What is academic library value, when viewed through an institutional lens?
  2. What library services, expertise, and resources have institutional value on your campus?
  3. How can you capture evidence of that value?
  4. What can you do with evidence of value once you have it? What decisions can you make? What actions can you take?

Workshop Leader Biography:

Megan Oakleaf is an Associate Professor in the iSchool at Syracuse University. She is the author of the Value of Academic Libraries Comprehensive Review and Report and has earned recognition and awards for articles published in top library and information science journals including College and Research Libraries, Portal, Reference and User Services Quarterly, and Journal of Documentation. Megan has presented at numerous conferences, including the American Library Association (ALA), Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), and Association for the Assessment of Learning in Higher Education (AALHE) national conferences, the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Library Assessment Conferences, the IUPUI Assessment Institute, the Texas A&M Assessment Conference, and EDUCAUSE. Her research areas include outcomes assessment, evidence-based decision making, information literacy instruction, and academic library impact and value.


Library Space Assessment: Bringing the Focus to Teaching and Learning

Leaders: Joan K. Lippincott (Coalition for Networked Information) and Kim Duckett (North Carolina State University Libraries)

Thursday, November 1, 8:30AM-3:30PM
Fee: $130

This workshop provides an overview of a wide range of methods for assessing learning spaces in libraries. In an introduction, the presenters will provide context for assessment in higher education today, particularly trends related to teaching and learning.

The workshop will review straightforward measures that often are in use to gauge the success of or problems with physical spaces. We will then stretch the thinking of the participants to consider additional kinds of assessments libraries can develop to link our spaces and services more closely to teaching and learning goals, and how we can operationalize some of our questions related to the impact of space on teaching and learning.

Workshop leaders will share good practice from a variety of institutions and will introduce the participants to the IMLS-funded Learning Space Toolkit, a partnership between NC State University and the design consultancy firms DEGW and Brightspot Strategy. We will describe a spectrum of techniques and their uses in various assessment contexts.

The workshop leaders will provide interactive experiences with a variety of needs assessment techniques and post-assessment methods. Participants will be encouraged, through a set of guided activities:

  • to develop goals and objectives for their assessment initiative (related to learning spaces),
  • to situate their work in a context related to campus initiatives or national trends,
  • to propose partners with whom they could work,
  • to outline some objectives and sample questions for their future assessment work,
  • and to describe the audience for the outcomes of their assessment findings

At the end of the workshop, participants will be asked to share key ideas they want to pursue when they return to campus and some of the concepts they found most useful from the workshop.

Audience: Librarians involved in or interested in assessing the effectiveness of non-classroom spaces in libraries, including learning commons, multimedia centers, and other technology-rich, student-centric spaces.

Practical Implications / Value: Attendees will benefit from rich discussion of the intersections between spaces, technology, teaching, and learning. They will leave the workshop with initial assessment goals and research questions to take back to their institutions.

In preparation for the workshop, the following articles are recommended:

Joan K. Lippincott, “Information Commons: Meeting Millennials’ Needs,” Journal of Library Administration, 50:1, January 2010.
A preprint PDF is available on the CNI website.

Aimee L. Whiteside, D. Christopher Brooks, and J.D. Walker. "Making the Case for Space." EDUCAUSE Review, v. 14, Sept. 22, 2010.
Available on the EDUCAUSE website.

Workshop Leaders' Biographies:

Joan K. Lippincott is the Associate Executive Director of the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI). She has been an active speaker and writer on information commons, assessment, services for today’s students, and mobile technologies. Her doctorate in higher education is from U. Maryland. Joan has worked in the libraries of Cornell, Georgetown, GWU, and SUNY.

Kim Duckett is the Principal Librarian for Digital Technologies and Learning at North Carolina State University Libraries. Her work focuses on trends in teaching and learning, the intersections between learning technologies and libraries, and needs assessment for space planning. She was named a Library Journal Mover and Shaker in 2009.


Getting Started with Learning Outcomes Assessment: Purposes, Practical Options, and Impact

Leader: Megan Oakleaf (iSchool, Syracuse University)

Thursday, November 1, 8:30AM-3:30PM
Fee: $130

Tasked with assessing information literacy on your campus? Confused about your options? Dissatisfied with assessments you’ve already attempted?

Intended for librarians considering, commencing, or retooling a plan for assessing student learning outcomes, this full-day workshop will include mini-lectures, discussion, and hands-on, scenario-based activities to engage participants in answering the following questions:

  1. What is the purpose of learning outcomes assessment in my library?
  2. What assessment tools can I use? What are the strengths and limitations of each? How do I choose the right one for my campus?
  3. How will my choices impact teaching and learning? How will I “close the loop”?
  4. How might I use learning outcomes assessment to highlight the value of my library to my overarching institution?

Workshop Leader Biography:

Megan Oakleaf is an Associate Professor in the iSchool at Syracuse University. She is the author of the Value of Academic Libraries Comprehensive Review and Report and has earned recognition and awards for articles published in top library and information science journals including College and Research Libraries, Portal, Reference and User Services Quarterly, and Journal of Documentation. Megan has presented at numerous conferences, including the American Library Association (ALA), Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), and Association for the Assessment of Learning in Higher Education (AALHE) national conferences, the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Library Assessment Conferences, the IUPUI Assessment Institute, the Texas A&M Assessment Conference, and EDUCAUSE. Her research areas include outcomes assessment, evidence-based decision making, information literacy instruction, and academic library impact and value.


Working Effectively with LibQUAL+®

Leaders: Raynna Bowlby and Martha Kyrillidou (Association of Research Libraries)

Thursday, November 1, 8:30AM-3:30PM
Fee: $130

The administration of a user survey is a significant investment for any library and it raises expectations among members of the user community and among staff. Many aspects of the LibQUAL+® survey administration process have been streamlined and there is rapid access to data and results. But some libraries indicate that they are not well-prepared to work effectively with and act upon the results, once received. This workshop will enable staff responsible for administering the LibQUAL+® survey to develop work plans that they can apply in their libraries in order to: perform some simple analyses of the quantitative data, present the results visually, make comparisons, identify what is actionable, organize their colleagues and committees to work with LibQUAL+®, present the results effectively to different stakeholders, utilize data to target areas for improvement, and develop a process of continuous assessment.

Audience: Survey administrators and members of assessment groups/teams.

  • Calculating statistics
  • Preparing customized charts & graphs
  • Using norms tables
  • Making peer comparisons
  • Doing longitudinal analysis
  • Identifying roles & responsibilities
  • Engaging others in understanding & utilizing the results
  • Targeting incremental improvements
  • Planning next steps

Pre-assignment: Review online "LibQUAL+® Flash tutorial"; Bring results notebook to session.

Workshop Leaders' Biographies:

Raynna Bowlby serves as a Consultant to ARL’s Statistics & Service Quality Programs. As a consultant, Raynna develops and delivers consulting and training support for libraries in areas including organizational development, strategic planning, work analysis, human resource allocation and training, implementation of process improvement and new work processes, and assessment initiatives.

Raynna is also affiliated with the Simmons College Graduate School of Library & Information Science (GSLIS) as Adjunct Faculty teaching Principles of Management. Formerly Raynna worked for twenty years in the Brown University Library, with 10 years as the organizational and staff development officer. She was responsible for library assessment activities and was the administrator of Brown’s LibQUAL+® survey in 2005. Raynna has an MLS from Simmons College and an MBA, with a specialization in General Management and Organizational Behavior, from the University of Rhode Island.

Martha Kyrillidou, Senior Director of the ARL Statistics and Service Quality Programs, has led ARL's statistics and measurement activities since 1994. She is responsible for identifying tools for measuring the organizational performance and effectiveness of academic and research libraries, leading the StatsQUAL® program that includes assessment tools such as LibQUAL+®, ClimateQUAL®, MINES for Libraries®, and DigiQUAL®. Previously, Martha worked in the Library Research Center at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Bureau of Research at the School of Education at Kent State University. Martha has an MLS and an MEd with specialization in Evaluation and Measurement from Kent State University; and a PhD in library and information science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2009). In 2007, she received Kent State's School of Library and Information Science Alumni of the Year Award; in 1988-89, a Fulbright Scholarship.


Successfully Managing Strategic Change with the Balanced Scorecard

Leaders: Donna Tolson (University of Virginia Library), Liz Mengel (Johns Hopkins University), and Vivian Lewis (McMaster University)

Thursday, November 1, 8:30AM-Noon
Fee: $80

Is your library overwhelmed with projects and initiatives? Are you having trouble finding resources to develop in new directions? Does your staff know which priorities are most important to your mission? The Balanced Scorecard, a management approach designed to manage change and implement strategy, may be just what you need.

Appropriate for anyone involved with mission, strategic planning, or assessment, this workshop will introduce you to the concepts of the Balanced Scorecard, an assessment-based management approach used for 20 years in the private sector, and more recently adopted by governmental agencies, non-profit organizations, and libraries. You will learn how to develop a strategy map, and draft some goals for your organization. You will also learn about measures and targets including a discussion on common measures being discovered by use in libraries using the balanced scorecard. You will learn how to select initiatives that address performance gaps. Finally, you will hear from the presenters about the challenges and advantages realized by their libraries in using this approach to manage change in their organizations.

The workshop will be led by Donna Tolson from the University of Virginia, Liz Mengel from Johns Hopkins University, and Vivian Lewis from McMaster University. All three were in the first cohort of ARL’s Balanced Scorecard Initiative, and have worked with consultants from Ascendant Strategy Management Group to learn how to refine the Balanced Scorecard approach to facilitate change and show value in mission-driven organizations such as libraries.

Workshop Leaders' Biographies:

Donna is the Library Strategist at the University of Virginia Library. In previous roles she managed the undergraduate library and the Scholars’ Lab. Prior to joining the UVa Library, she worked for twenty years in the areas of demographic research for the Commonwealth of Virginia, and at the U.S. Census Bureau.

Liz is currently Associate Director for Scholarly Resources and Special Collections at the Johns Hopkins University. Prior to her work at Johns Hopkins she spent 20 years as a librarian and business analyst at Shell Oil Company in Houston, Texas, where they used the balanced scorecard.

Vivian Lewis is Associate University Librarian for Organizational Development and Acting University Librarian at McMaster. In her AUL capacity, she oversaw strategic planning, assessment, human resources, budget and development. Vivian has been working with balanced scorecard at McMaster since 2009.